Race Archive

Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Race Relations Resource Centre and Education Trust

Home Videos

VIDEOS

Throughout the year we run a wide range of events, activities, and workshops. Our collection of videos highlights some of this work and its impact on local communities. If you’re interested in participating in future events, take a look at our News and Events page.

 Student Shorts

In 2019, The Ahmed Iqbal Ullah RACE Centre worked alongside Dr Sophie Everest at the University of Manchester to commission second-year Drama and Film students to produce a collection of short films. Our aim was for the films to work as a bridge, connecting our archive collections to the real-life groups, individuals and stories that they represent and in turn archiving the films into our collection. The films were screened at a public event hosted by historian and broadcaster, David Olusoga in January 2020

Mother to Daughter

Tendayi Madzunzu and her daughter Cindy consider their cultural heritage and their relationship to one other. Inspired by the recent project: Tracing the Heritage of Zimbabweans Living in Manchester. This film was made by Florence Dixon, Mariella Dyckhoff, Bronte James, and Tristan Simpson. Course leader, Dr Sophie Everest supervised the production of this film. Running time: 5:40

Carnival Queen

Three generations of one, Manchester-based family reflect on the meaning of carnival. Inspired by the Locita Brandy and Carnival archive collections held at Ahmed Iqbal Ullah RACE Centre. This film was made by Eliza Lewis, Sophia Hadji-Michael, Carl Fitzgerald and Eleanor Johnston. Running time: 5:43

Spirit of Community

Fereshteh Mozafari (Director of Sheba Arts) and workshop participants explain the importance of performance which helps them to explore aspects of their Iranian heritage. Inspired by the recent project: Gardens of Babylon. This film was created by Sophia Rosen-Fouladi, Menna Morgan, Jonah Rossiter and Emilia Koziel. Running time: 6.00

Rose Hill: Barry Sesay, A Life in Stockport

Barry reflects on his life and neighbourhood. Inspired by the recent project: Black History in Stockport. This film was created by Amelia Howard, Sam James, Catalina Noguera and Ella Vincenti. Running time: 5.47

No Place Like Hulme

Contemporary residents share experiences and perceptions of their neighbourhood. Inspired by the Hulme Study Archive collection held at Ahmed Iqbal Ullah RACE Centre. This film was made by Ella Marsden, Jasmine Rowland, Lada Naryskina and Robert Smailes. Running time: 5.53

Black Then, Black Now 

For Black History Month 2019, The Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Education Trust and Big People Music presented Black Then, Black Now: 3 days of history, 3 days of futurity on the 1st, 28th and 30th October @ Central Library, a chance to come and experience black culture, what it means, and why unifying a social movement forward is crucial to how we define a legacy.

Black Then, Black Now

For Black History Month 2019, The Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Education Trust and Big People Music presented Black Then, Black Now: 3 days of history, 3 days of futurity on the 1st, 28th and 30th October @ Central Library, a chance to come and experience black culture, what it means, and why unifying a social movement forward is crucial to how we define a legacy.

Yoga and Fine Art

In this workshop Rakaya demonstrated various techniques of painting. Audiences painted their own canvas artwork while exploring African diaspora themes. Rakaya is a Manchester based artist and digital illustrator. Nai Davina led a session of African yoga in the Performance Space, with both practical and educational benefits.

A Story of your Crown

Central Library’s Performance Space was transformed into a salon of sorts; hosting ‘A Story of your Crown’, a hair braiding workshop run by Sophia Reeves. This masterclass in the science and skill of braiding hair aimed to inspire, empower, and educate on Black hair, which has been, and continues to be, heavily politicised.

A Sense of the Future

We joined Keisha and three wonderful creatives as they went on a journey through the senses. Tolu Ajayi (musician), Maya Chowdhry (live artist) and Sam Remi-Akinwale (spoken artist) shared performances and objects that trigger the senses as they considered what the future holds for people of colour.